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NEAR TRUTHS: I.B. BAD PLAYS PAC MAN
Sir Lucian's power trio (3/26a)
AN EPIC HOT STREAK
All roads lead to Rhone. (3/26a)
EU APPROVES COPYRIGHT DIRECTIVE
YouTube is not happy. (3/26a)
MUSIC BIZ HALL OF FAME CLASS OF 2019
They must've read our Black Music History special issue. (3/26a)
ROCK HALL HEAD JOEL PERESMAN ON THE RECORD
Spreading the gospel of rock & roll. (3/26a)
THE NEXT RECORDING ACADEMY HEAD IS...
(The envelope, please.)
IT'S NOT JUST ABOUT MARKETSHARE
But it is, really. Isn't it?
WHAT IF I DON'T STREAM?
First of all, don't panic.
WHO ORDERED THIS PIZZA?
Seriously, come get it now or we're eating it.
Pub Crawling
HOW TO AVOID THE PELOTON PROBLEM
3/25/19

Fitness brand Peloton is currently being sued by a fleet of indie publishers demanding unpaid royalties for songs used in the company’s training videos. What lessons can brands that use a lot of music take away from this episode? What do rights holders need to bear in mind moving forward? We asked Bob Barbiere, Chief Strategy Officer and SVP Global Licensing for DJ-centric distribution platform Dubset, for some context.

What do brands need to do to avoid getting into hot water with rights holders?
As a licensing-centric company, Dubset learned early on that brands must be protected from the risks of licensing. We always recommend to brands and others not directly affiliated with the music industry to work through third-party agents that truly understand and have experience in all aspects of music licensing, particularly those that assume all risks and liabilities. 

Why do high-profile companies think they can get away with not paying for music, when their content is widely disseminated?
Great question. I’d like to believe it’s not so much “getting away without paying” as it is the complexities associated with it. Specific to composition and publishing, licensing is incredibly complex. There are sets of licenses for live venues (think of music playing at a health club), while there are other licensing structures when you stream music to consumers, and then there’s licenses specific to the attachment of music to video (synchronization). So imagine when you have some crossover thinking you licensed everything correctly when in reality you left a couple of holes. In this case it appears Peloton did a bunch of licensing but the holes that might exist appear pretty big based on the claims.

Making it worse is the fact that technology has evolved so quickly over the past fifteen years that the restrictions and licenses associated with music have reached the point in some areas that they no longer make sense. There are amazing opportunities for brands to take advantage of with the advent of digital music distribution.

Dubset was created specifically to remove the licensing challenges in a space occupied by brands, content creators, artists, and composers, where it was previously impossible for any brand to associate themselves with a DJ set. Now, not only can we deliver a liability-free solution (the brand’s attachment to a piece of music) to the brand, we can do so within hours, not months or years. While there will continue to be some trip ups, there’s enough licensing specialists available to brands to ensure cases like Peloton’s are more the outlier than the norm.

How much money is waiting to be excavated in similar unlicensed uses?
It really depends upon the energy and focus rights holders and licensing agents want to put into it. As Peloton is learning, there are statutory penalties for infringement that very quickly can run into the billions. Music and technology are now bringing a new level of consumer access, but that access comes with risk. Even so, I see a lot of great licensing-tech companies now bringing licensing efficiency, reducing market friction, with the proper connection of brands to content in a manner that facilitates scale and success.

PULSE MUSIC SIGNS NATE TRAVELLER
3/21/19

Pulse Music Group has signed artist and songwriter Nate Traveller to an exclusive worldwide co-publishing deal. This is Pulse A&R Derek Oxford’s first official signing to the pubco.

Nate Traveller (Nate Morales) is a 21 year-old from Naples, Florida, part of a growing movement of creatives popping up in the Southwest region of the state, including Dominic Fike, RipMattBlack and Brendan Bennett. Traveller is is co-managed by Nancy Matalon and Mojoe Nicosia.

Seen wondering when that Postmates order for brownies might be showing up are (l-r) Derek OxfordMaria Egan, Nate Traveller, Mojoe Nicosia, Nancy Matalon and Josh Abraham.

PRO TIP
3/20/19

The BMI Latin Awards took place at the Beverly Wilshire last night, and Sony/ATV won Publisher of the Year for the fourth year in a row. This success follows the Pubco winning the same title at the ASCAP Latin Awards earlier this month.

Seen celebrating the win before the afterparty in Jorge Mejia’s humidor are (l-r) Sony/ATV songwriters Haze, Motiff, Servando Primera and Mario Caceres, BMI topper Mike O’Neill, Prexy Latin America/U.S. Latin Mejia, SATV writer Arthur Hanlon, VP Sync/New Biz Amy Roland, Latin VP Biz Dev Veronica Vaccarezza, Latin Senior Director, Admin Aireen Hevia, BMI's Delia Orjuela, SATV Latin A&R Manager Monica Jordan, Latin Manager, Creative Yendi Rodriguez, SVP Biz & Legal Nicole Giacco  and Mexico A&R Director Francisco Granados.