Quantcast
Advertisement
 Email

 First Name

 Last Name

 Company

 Country
CAPTCHA code
Captcha: (type the characters above)

BATTLE OF THE
HITS LIST STARS
Celebrity faceoff (6/24a)
CHART FINAL: DRAKE'S DANCE VICTORY
Drizzy's fox trot (6/24a)
SOULFUL NOIR
Today's quiet storm (6/24a)
COOPER PLANS TO DEPART WMG IN '23
See ya later, alligator. (6/23a)
NEAR TRUTHS: FROM THE MOUNTAINTOPS
I.B. Bad surveys the landscape. (6/22a)
SUPERSTAR RELEASES
Who's next?
MUSIC BIZ SPECIAL
It's Comic-Con for numbers geeks.
THE BIG CHEESE
Theories of evolution from 30,000 feet.
THE NEXT GIANT DEAL
A&R in overdrive.
Music City
LIVE FROM NASHVILLE:
LOUIS MESSINA
7/6/17

Louis Messina, Messina Touring Group

Given Nashville’s changing landscape, what’s changing in your world? How are you meeting the challenge? What needs to be fixed?
Nashville is becoming very modern, and this is impacting the country music industry somewhat. It puts out quantity over quality at times, rubber-stamping musicians, and the product is repetitive. I wouldn’t say it’s really changed touring for me or the artists I work with. I’m lucky to work for talented, versatile artists who stand out. Those artists I work with still bring immense passion to the stage, which makes a massive difference in a world where everyone seems the same.

How has your perspective on stadium tours evolved?
Very few can use this model for their touring base. They have to be a real star, with great songs; an entertainer, who can deliver night after night and connect to the audience. And they have to be able to connect to a wide range of people. You may have a great fanbase in Nashville, but to succeed as a stadium tour you have to have a lot of fans in a lot of different cities around every major stadium you’re going into. 60,000 is a lot of tickets, and it takes a lot to motivate people to be part of it.

What are your thoughts on festivals? Are they sustainable? What’s their impact on your overall touring business?
There are some great ones, like Stagecoach, and some not-so-great ones. The number of cancellations this year speaks for itself. You have to know what you are doing to put on a successful festival—and it is hard to get new talent year after year with so much competition. The rotation seems to be the same year after year. When the artists I work with are taking a break from touring, they might be playing these festivals, but it doesn’t really impact the business that I do.