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STRINGER ON "THE ISSUES AND ACTIONS NEEDED"
Sony Music is all in. (6/1a)
"REAL AND CONSTRUCTIVE CHANGE": SIR LUCIAN SPEAKS OUT
UMG is all in. (6/1a)
RAPINO: SUPPORTING BLACK CULTURE, ANTI-RACISM
Live Nation is all in. (5/30a)
WMG ON COPING WITH THE MOMENT
Warner Music is all in. (6/1a)
ARTISTS MAKE THEIR VOICES HEARD (UPDATE)
The stars are coming out. (6/1a)
TUESDAY
THE SHOW MUST BE PAUSED
TIME TO REFLECT
TIME TO ACT
Critics' Choice
RECORD STORE DAY 2020 RELEASES READY TO HIT THE BINS
3/6/20

Paul McCartney, Pink Floyd, David Bowie, The Grateful Dead and Britney Spears are among the names found on the list of releases slated for Record Store Day, taking place this year on 4/18.

McCartney's McCartney (UMe/MLP/Capitol) is receiving a 50th anniversary release in a limited edition—7,000 copies—half-speed mastered vinyl pressing.

Two Pink-Floyd related releases are part of the dozen-title line-up from Sony Music’s Legacy Recordings: A 12” single of See Emily Play b/w “Vegetable Man” from Nick Mason’s Saucerful Of Secrets and the 7” of “Arnold Layne” from 2007, the last time David Gilmour, Mason and Richard Wright performed together.

Among Legacy’s other offerings are  Spears’ Oops!…I Did It Again (Remixes and B-Sides) on baby blue vinyl; the previously unreleased Cheap Trick double LP Out To Get You! Live 1977; Miles Davis’ Double Image: Rare Miles From The Bitches Brew Sessions on red vinyl; a picture disc of TLC’s Waterfalls EP; and Tyler, The Creator’s Cherry Bomb.

Rhino’s Record Store Day collection features Bowie’s double LP I’m Only Dancing (The Soul Tour ’74), Alice Cooper’s Live From The Apollo Theatre Glasgow Feb 19, 1982 (two-LP; 7,000 copies) and the five-LP Grateful Dead Buffalo 5/9/77 plus  picture discs from The Cure, boxed sets from the John Prine and Notorious B.I.G. and Warren Zevon's Greatest Hits (According To Judd Apatow).

Island Records and UMe are releasing a 40th anniversary of U2’s“11 O’Clock Tick Tock” on limited edition 12” transparent blue vinyl that includes the full-length version of the track, the original  B-side “Touch”and previously unreleased live recordings of “Touch” and “Twilight” from The Marquee in London in September 1980.

Other UMe releases include Brian Eno’s Rams soundtrack, the Steve Wilson Stereo Mix of Roxy Music, and 7” singles from Jimi Hendrix, John Lennon & the Plastic Ono Band and Cat Stevens.

Capitol’s Beck will be releasing a limited edition double-A side 7” vinyl single of St. Vincent’s remix of “Uneventful Days” and Khruangbin’s remix of “No Distraction.”

The Black Keys will release a limited-edition, 45-RPM version of Let’s Rock (Easy Eye Sound/Nonesuch) on two 180-gram vinyl discs that comes in a holographic gatefold jacket. The set is limited to 7,500 pieces worldwide.

Among items that caught our eye are Post Malone’s four 3” singles, Keith Richards’ 45 of “Hate It When You Leave” b/w “Key to the Highway,” Sam Smith’s “I Feel Love” picture disc, The Kinks Kronikles on double LP, k.d. lang’s Drag on vinyl, a 10” of Gary Clark Jr. f/Andra Day’s “Pearl Cadillac,” Mac DeMarco’s Other Here Comes The Cowboy Demos, and the Studio One reggae compilation Studio First: From the Vaults, Vol. 2.

The full list of special releases is here

 

RHINO REWARDS INNOVATOR HUGHES
2/28/20

John Hughes has been promoted to Senior Vice President of Fan Engagement and Innovation,  continuing to spearhead Rhino’ Entertainment’s initiatives to grow new and existing audiences for WMG’s catalog.

A 10-year veteran of Rhino, he developed and implemented Rhino’s first Fan Engagement department, created the Rhino Podcast and produced recent deluxe editions of albums by The Cars and produced two new albums by The Monkees.

He reports to Rhino President Mark Pinkus.

 “Over the past decade, John’s creativity and forward-thinking philosophies have upheld Rhino’s place as one of the most innovative record labels in the business,” says Pinkus.

“I look forward to watching more of his ideas come to life and evolve as we continue to develop deeper and broader relationships with music fans across all the eras and genres of Warner Music’s unparalleled catalog. I hope that someday he’ll autography my script for Home Alone.”

RE-TELLING THE BAND'S STORY
2/21/20

 

Robbie Robertson is the last man standing from the group of four Canadians and a Southerner who demonstrated in the 1970s how to take decades of American music and distill it into one fragrant broth.

As such, he gets to tell the story of The Band—yes, Garth Hudson is with us as well, but he’s always been the quiet one—in Daniel Roher’s documentary Once Were Brothers, which opens today in Los Angeles and New York.  

Roher and Robertson take us through The Band’s beginnings, their backup roles with Ronnie Hawkins and Bob Dylan, the move to Woodstock and their collective ambitions as musicians and songwriters. Then there’s the stories about drugs and how the hard stuff took down one of the most vital acts in American rock & roll. Robertson avoided the narcotics; the others indulged heavily, we’re told.

The story is told with spectacular clips—one shot of a stadium show gives you an indication of how big they were in the mid-1970s despite a lack of hit singles—and the talking heads recall how Robertson. & Co. were as important as The Beatles. Eric Clapton even says he wanted to be their guitarist.

Robertson’s buddy Martin Scorsese made one of the greatest concert films ever, The Last Waltz, and basically told Robbie’s side of the story in that 1978 masterpiece. Robertson told his story in book from four years ago in Testimony, which is largely the script for Once Were Brothers.

The break-up of The Band here is far more acrimonious and troubling in the Once Were Brothers telling than The Last Waltz’s “gosh we’re tired—let’s do a show and hang it up” fable. Robertson’s bandmate Levon Helm told his side of the story in a book; Rick Danko and Richard Manuel never did.

Fortunately the music speaks for itself: the Capitol package celebrating the 50th anniversary of their self-titled second album—the one we called “the brown one” back in the day—is a glorious reminder of their uniqueness, spirit and harmony. That package, with essays,  their Woodstock performances and photos, is only a chapter of The Band, but it’s a story full of promise and hope, the one many fans of The Band should chose to re-live again and again.