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NEAR TRUTHS: CATALOG DANCE
Money is no object; rising interest rates be damned. (10/6a)
GRAMMY CHEW:
RAP EDITION
Michael and Kyle find a feast of hip-hop to chew on. (10/5a)
SONG REVENUE: “UNHOLY” MOLY
Sam & Kim get us in the Halloween spirit. (10/6a)
PRIMARY WAVE ADDS
$2B FUND
Hats off to Larry, who's doing the "Blitzkrieg Bop." (10/6a)
LORETTA LYNN,
1932-2022
Honoring the life and legacy of a truth-teller (10/5a)
GRAMMY SEASON
New categories! New rules! New WTF!
THE BIG DEAL
It's the one you didn't see coming.
RAID AT MAR-A-LAGO
"Who took my passports?"
HITS' 36TH ANNIVERSARY SPECIAL
Allow us to apologize in advance.
Blighty Beat
U.K. ACTS DOWN 45% AT EURO FESTS
8/9/22

British acts have experienced a 45% drop in European festival bookings post-Brexit, according to analysis by campaign group, Best for Britain.

The study looked at the line-ups for three major European festivals—BenicassimSziget and Lollapalooza—in 2017 to 2019 and compared the number of British acts booked with those on the bill for the 2022 editions. 

The sobering stats show how the U.K. Government’s “dud Brexit deal” is robbing emerging British talent of opportunities abroad, Best for Britain CEO Naomi Smith said.

Challenges associated with British acts playing overseas post-Brexit have been well-documented and include costly bureaucracy and delays at border checks. These issues are reportedly disproportionately impacting new acts, who are losing out on the common practice of securing last-minute vacancies in a festival line-up. 

Chief Executive of the Incorporated Society of Musicians and U.K. Trade and Business Commissioner Deborah Annetts said: “Whoever ends up replacing Boris Johnson must commit to removing this needless bureaucracy which is stifling the prosperity and creativity of the next generation of British musicians.”