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U.K. UNVEILS NEW VISA RULES 
5/19/20

International musicians looking to tour and work in the U.K. will be required to apply for a Tier 5 visa beginning in January. It is expected to cost £244.

The visa will cover performances, auditions, workshops, festival appearances, talks and events. In addition, musicians from the EU and worldwide who are travelling to the U.K. for work must show that they have nearly £1k in savings 90 days before applying for the visa, in order to prove they can support themselves (unless they are already “fully approved”). 

At the moment, it doesn’t cost anything for international musicians and their teams to enter the U.K. for work purposes—all that’s required is a Certificate of Sponsorship form (CoS).

The measure goes against what music organisations have been lobbying for. The Musicians’ Union and the Incorporated Society of Musicians (ISM) have asked for a free or cheap Musicians’ Passport that lasts for at least two years and covers all EU member states. 

Last week, ISM also called for a two-year extension to the Brexit transition period, which is due to end on 12/31 as a result of the coronavirus crisis. 

“Going straight from COVID-19 to the end of the transition period without ensuring enough time to negotiate new trading agreements will be devastating for the music profession and the wider music and creative industries,” Deborah Annetts, Chief Executive of ISM, said.

The news was first reported by NME