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SIR LUCIAN
TURNS IT UP
UMG chief is sitting on top of the world. (9/17a)
OCEAN ACTIVITY?
Let's be Frank. (9/17a)
A HARD DAY’S
HITS LIST
Stars across the board (9/17a)
GRAMMYS HAVE A NEW AWARDS CHIEF
Will she be able to clean up the mess? (9/17a)
CH-CH-CH-CHANGES
FOR BOWIE CATALOG
WMG snags a cornucopia of sound and vision. (9/16a)
HITS' 35TH ANNIVERSARY
A chronicle of the inexplicable.
GRAMMY: ALBUM OF THE YEAR
We make yet more predictions, which you are free to ignore.
2022 TOURS
May we all be vaxxed by then.
ROCK'S NEW CHAPTER
Power pop, global glam and the return of the loud.
THE B-SIDE
JAI UTTAL'S BURN BALM
7/21/21

Veteran musician Jai Uttal has been making devotional music for years, and quite a few listeners whose own cosmologies are a million miles from Jai's have found these records deep and inviting. His latest, Let Me Burn (out 8/4), is intended as "a balm for post-pandemic stress," and if you can get with a great many chanted "hare krishnas" and "hare ramas" (which you probably can if you're any kind of George Harrison fan), you may well find it as soothing as a spa getaway. Moving across the stylistic spectrum, the set incorporates everything from Indian and jazz textures to gospel/soul to country/folk. Opener "Campfire Sri Ram," featuring Kirtan luminaries Deva Premal & Miten, is a particularly lovely excursion. The title cut—which is much closer to a traditional pop song—moves from delicate incantation to an easy groove that recalls Peter Gabriel. If you can surrender yourself to the spiritual sparkle of it all, this is balm indeed.