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THE B-SIDE
JADE BIRD
9/25/19

IN FLIGHT

A 21-year-old writer/artist from England with a deep feel for American roots music, Jade Bird has forged a style as authentic in terms of her personal experience as the sounds that inspired her from across the Atlantic.

Her 2017 debut EP, Something American, and her self-titled album, released earlier this year, were both produced by Simone Felice (Felice Brothers, The Lumineers, Bat for Lashes), whom Bird has praised as “a total guide in my musical career, embracing the eccentric and always digging to find the magic and capture it.”

These recordings, which nimbly balance confessional ballads (“What Am I Here For,” “My Motto”) and full-tilt rockers (“Uh Huh,” “I Get No Joy”), present an artist whose music is at once strikingly sophisticated and disarmingly ingenuous.


In what respect did American music and artists inspire Something American? Who are some of your current and all-time favorites?
Absolutely! My parents were into very different music from acoustic. So when I discovered the guitar, I was dumbfounded. It was like all the world’s song opportunities were just there in four chords…or three…or two. I love Gillian Welch, Patti Smith and Kate Bush, but at the moment, I have profound respect for a lot of pre-riot-grrrl bands like The Raincoats, Kleenex—and also, of course, the riot-grrrl bands. 

After Something American was so well-received, where did you draw inspiration from while writing your self-titled first album?
You know, it was very autobiographical in a way. I know who and what I was writing about on every song of the record. From an argument in New York (“Ruins”) to a feeling of numbness in the country (“I Get No Joy”), it was life events, without sounding too cliché.

What led to your signing with Glassnote?
We shared similar values. I met Daniel Glass and quickly worked out that our work ethics were matched. I also love the authenticity the roster has—Phoenix is one of my favorite bands, full-stop, Mumford and Chvrches likewise. You just know that those artists are in control of their own career and have this incredible support structure the label offers. 

What was your reaction when you learned you’d been nominated for Emerging Act of the Year by the Americana Music Association?
I was thrilled. The Americana Association brings Bonnie Raitt, Brandi Carlile, John Prine and Mavis Staples in one room and on one stage. You can’t argue with how prestigious that is. 

How would that acknowledgment compare to a Grammy nom?
I guess a Grammy always represents that you’ve crossed over into other genres. It’s this symbol of respect not only from your own music community but of many others. So, that achievement would be beyond words.