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YE JOLLY OLDE iTUNES U.K. CHARTS

On the morning after British voters kept David Cameron’s Conservative Party in power, one might argue that the citizenry is manifesting conservative values in its music consumption. In keeping with recent trends, five of the Top 10 albums are more-bang-for-the-buck hits compilations, Taylor Swift and Hozier are certified sure things, and only one glitzy “deluxe” version appears on the big board. Which brings us to Mumford & Sons’ debuting Wilder Mind, and the not so surprising discovery that U.K. consumers are voting with their credit cards for the beloved band’s third album, having readily accepted its stylistic shift.

Speaking of the status quo, the top three singles are unchanged from a week ago, while eight of last week’s Top 10 are holdovers. Indeed, the only suggestions of progressiveness are the accented Ü and Ø, which have a certain whimsical quality in common with emoji (which is the plural of the Japanese emoji—but that’s a story for another day).

ANALYZING THE ACMS
A few firsts among the ACM Awards noms. (2/26a)
LIVE NATION EYES
SUMMER RESTART
Rapino's ready for festivals to return. (2/26a)
DODGING BULLETS AND DIVINE PURPOSE
Kamasi Washington answers our questions. (2/26a)
iHEARTMEDIA RESTRUCTURES BUSINESS UNITS
Radio giant makes a shift. (2/26a)
FREEDOM NOW AND OTHER JAMS, PT. 1
Social justice through the lens of jazz (2/23a)
BLACK HISTORY MONTH
A jazz chronicle of fighting the power.
GRAMMYS: WHERE TO FROM HERE?
After the snubs, the show.
ACQUITTED
In a phenomenal display of cowardice.
MOVING THE NEEDLE
When vaccination schedules and touring schedules meet.
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