The greatest growth was shown by Daniel Glass’ latest discovery (following the 2009 breakthrough of Phoenix), Mumford & Sons, whose week-to-week increases have just propelled the upstart folk-rockers past 500k.

I.B. BAD ON THE YEAR IN MUSIC: INDIES & ROOKIES

2010 Began With #1s From Ke$ha and Vampire Weekend, Signs of Good Things to Come
Here are the most significant happenings of 2010, 12 months of heated activity in all the key sectors of the industry: records, publishing, digital and touring. Today, our in-house pundit continues his look back on the wild and challenging year with a pair of much-needed feel-good stories...

THE INDIE UPSWING: January was a historic month for the little guys, as XL Recordings/Beggars Banquet art-rockers Vampire Weekend debuted at #1 with 121k, followed two weeks later by a #4 bow from veteran Merge band Spoon. The biggest noise was made in August by Merge’s Arcade Fire, whose chart-topping, 156k debut set a new commercial standard for indie rock. The greatest growth was shown by Daniel Glass’ latest discovery (following the 2009 breakthrough of Phoenix), Mumford & Sons, whose week-to-week increases have just propelled the upstart folk-rockers past 500k. Beggars and Merge both moved the needle in new-release marketshare, scoring .9% and .6%, respectively, making them the #2 and #3 indies behind E1 Entertainment, with 1.5%.

THE CLASS OF 2010: Youth was served this year, as a passel of previously unknown acts made strong first impressions, a gratifying phenomenon during these challenging times. This bumper crop of probable career artists included Atlantic’s Bruno Mars, Universal Republic’s Florence + the Machine, Young Money/Cash Money/Universal Motown’s Nicki Minaj and Glassnote’s Mumford & Sons. Leading the pack was 16-year-old Canadian song-and-dance man Justin Bieber, whose My World 2.0 (Island/IDJ) has sold 2.14m, while his 2009 debut album My World has added 975k on the year. Two other rookies are in seven figures: Young Money/Cash Money/Universal Motown MC Drake, who’s at 1.2m, and RCA/RMG’s Ke$ha, with 1.07m. But it should also be noted that few outside of the mainstream country audience were aware of the existence of Capitol/EMI’s Lady Antebellum before the co-ed trio’s sophomore album Need You Now crossed over, scoring the year’s #2-selling album.

ON THE BMM COVER:
RICO WADE
ATL legend (6/17a)
KEN & FRIENDS FILL THE FORUM
High times in Inglewood (6/20a)
BEADS! FEEDS! TIKTOK EXPANDS TAY'S ERAS TOUR HUB
Collect 'em all (6/20a)
FESTIVAL FORECAST: IT'S MUDDY OUT THERE
Sloshing through the fun (6/20a)
WELCOME TO ATLANTA
Black Music Month in the ATL (6/18a)
THE GRAMMY SHORT LIST
Who's already a lock?
COUNTRY'S NEWEST DISRUPTOR
Three chords and some truth you may not be ready for.
AI IS ALREADY EATING YOUR LUNCH
The kids can tell the difference... for now.
INDIE DISTRIBUTION'S RISE TO GLORY
The discovery engine is revving higher.
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