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“He’s basically laid it out there bare bones, and the music has resonated with critics and music fans alike.”
—-Rich Egan, Hard 8 Management
THE SON ALSO RISES
Jakob Dylan Follows in the Footsteps of You Know Who By Creating His Own Solo Persona
This will be the first story about Jakob Dylan that doesn’t mention his father.

That’s right, we promise not to say a single word about Donovan.

Nevertheless, the singer/songwriter’s first solo album apart from his longtime band the Wallflowers, the Rick Rubin-produced Seeing Things, on Columbia Records, seems to beg comparison with his old man in its acoustic orientation, even as it sets out in its own very personal direction.

“The trouble, doll, no not moving mountains,” he sings on the album’s first single, “Something Good This Way Comes,” “but digging the ground that you’re on.”

That outlook results in Jakob’s most forthcoming work to date, one that has already generated Grammy buzz in critical circles. The album’s opening week sales of 24k trumped all expectations, with that number now climbing close to 100k since its June 10 release.

The album has moved a majority of its copies through the partnership with Starbucks, which came about thanks to former Hear Music exec Tim Ziegler along with Columbia Chairman Steve Barnett and Mark DiDia.

“Starbucks has been a huge component of the project’s success,” says new Dylan manager Rich Egan of Hard 8 Management. “Barnett and Didia went above and beyond the call of duty to get the deal done, a clear sign they recognize the changing marketplace. They had to clear a lot of hurdles to get this done.

Dylan just finished supporting Eric Clapton in Europe and will go on tour with Willie Nelson through the fall.

As a solo artist, he performed at last summer’s Bonnaroo and Austin City Limits (both festival and TV show) as well as the Bumbershoot and Rothbury festivals.

The U.K. press has been particularly enthusiastic, with a recent London Sunday Times cover, as well as rave reviews and features in Mojo and Uncut.

Working without the safety net of his former band, the Wallflowers, for the first time, Jakob opens up more than he has in the past on several of the tracks. In the closing “This End of the Telescope,” he sings: “I was born in the summer of Sam/Smaller and sooner than planned/In the spitting image of the man/Raised by wolves on the fat of the land.”

At once an acknowledgement of a unique upbringing, to say the least, it’s also a claim to be allowed to grow—and be accepted—as an artist on his terms. “Got my weapons/I’m lying low/On this end of the telescope/I see clearly at last.”

By stepping out as a solo performer, Jakob Dylan may beg comparisons with his old man, but at the same time, he begins to create an artistic space to call his own.

“It was all about presenting Jakob’s lyrics and vocals up front,” says producer Rubin. “Having them stand by themselves.”

“It took a lot of courage for Jakob to strip away the band, both musically and in name,” says Egan. “He’s basically laid it out there bare bones, and the music has resonated with critics and music fans alike.”

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