Quantcast
The techniques, worthy of an episode of CSI, include comparing song files’ digital fingerprints, also known as "hashes," to a library of such fingerprints the RIAA has kept of files traded on Napster going back to 2000.
"NYCFASHIONGIRL" DRESSED
DOWN BY RIAA
Subpoena Target Fights to Save Anonymity; Trade Org, Answering in Court, Reveals Forensic Techniques
"Elementary, my dear Sherman."

Such is what one would imagine a pipe-smoking, hunting-hat-wearing investigator might be saying to RIAA President Cary Sherman following submission of a lengthy court brief disputing a Brooklyn woman’s efforts to keep her identity from being disclosed.

The brief, filed this week, details what the RIAA claims to be the woman’s illicit file-sharing activities. The woman—identified thus far only by her "nycfashiongirl" screen name—has claimed that all her song files were made from CDs she and her family already owned.

But the RIAA contends that "nycfashiongirl" shared over 900 songs online, as well as a copy of the movie Pretty Woman, according to press reports. Based on her sharing activity and apparent lack of response to instant-message warnings sent by the RIAA asking her to knock it off, the organization served her internet service provider, Verizon, with a subpoena seeking her identity.

The subpoena, one of some 1,300 similar documents issued by the RIAA so far, resulted in "nycfashiongirl"'s attorney seeking to overturn the subpoena.

In response, the RIAA filed papers with the court Tuesday detailing techniques the organization has used to track the woman’s activity and evidence that they say proves she is "not an innocent or accidental infringer."

The techniques, worthy of an episode of CSI, include comparing song files’ digital fingerprints, also known as "hashes," to a library of such fingerprints the RIAA has kept of files traded on Napster going back to 2000. The digital fingerprint technique has been used by federal investigators as a way to prosecute hackers.

Another technique has to do with something called "metadata," or information hidden within MP3 files describing its source. The RIAA claims that examining metatdata allows it to determine where music files originated (either by ripping a CD or shared over the Internet).

"The source for nycfashiongirl’s sound recordings was not her own personal CDs," the RIAA brief states.

See you in court.

HITS LIST IS
IN THE MAIL
A not-so-subtle reminder to fill out that ballot. (10/15a)
NEAR TRUTHS: THE LONG AND WINDING ROAD
The lives behind live music. (10/14a)
HARVEY MASON JR.:
THE HITS INTERVIEW
The Grammy chief takes our call. (10/14a)
RAINMAKERS 2020: COMING SOON
It will rain again this fall--we guarantee it. (10/13a)
STEVIE WONDER PARTNERS WITH REPUBLIC
First music in 15 years. (10/14a)
RAINMAKERS 2020
Bring your umbrella.
GRAMMY OUTLIERS
Mulling possible surprises.
HALLOWEEN IN QUARANTINE
Why not wear a mask indoors?
ELECTION 2020
What drugs will help us get there?
 Email

 First Name

 Last Name

 Company

 Country
CAPTCHA code
Captcha: (type the characters above)