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U.S. STILL BUYS THE MOST MUSIC

As Far As Rampant Consumerism Goes,
You Gotta Give It Up For The U.S.A.
The U.S. music market remained at the top of the charts in both growth and sales in 1999, up 8% to $14.25 billion, according to statistics provided by global recording body IFPI.

The groups' report said, of the top five markets, only the U.S. and the U.K. showed growth when calculated in local currency.

Americans bought the most music, 3.9 units each in the year, followed by the British at 3.8, the report says. The Germans were next at 3.1.

Meanwhile, the global market was up 1% to $38.5 billion when compared with figures from 1998. Total units sold was 3.8 billion, with CD sales increasing 3%.

Sales in Japan, the second biggest market, fell 7%. With a 4% gain, the U.K. landed at No. 3, passing Germany, which traditionally has finished third. This year, Germany came in fourth, as sales dipped 2%.

France, down 4%, held at No. 5, and Canada, down 9%, still passed Brazil, down 43%, to reach No. 6. Australia, up 5%, jumped two spots to No. 8, and Spain, with 4% growth, dropped to No. 9. Appearing for the first time in the top 10 was Mexico—despite a 30% drop in sales.

HITS LIST: AMPERSANDS
Dynamic duos (12/3a)
TAYLOR'S TREMENDOUS YEAR
She'd make one helluva CEO. (12/3a)
THEY CALL THE WINDFALL MARIAH (HOLIDAY EDITION)
Ch-chingle bells (12/3a)
SONG REVENUE:
BOWS OF HOLLY
Adele is money. (12/3a)
UTA MUSIC EXPANDS IN NASHVILLE
Reshuffling the deck (12/3a)
CHESTNUTS
Roasting.
STOCKINGS
Stuffing.
PIPERS
Piping.
SANTA
Coming.
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