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YTD MARKET SHARE
It's a mad, mad, mad, mad music biz. (6/13a)
NEAR TRUTHS: THE HITS KEEP COMING (PART TWO)
Born in 1986 by mad scientists; still lurking. (6/17a)
HITS LIST GOES COUNTRY
Pairs well with grits and gravy. (6/14a)
SUMMERTIME ROLLS: FESTIVAL SEASON IS UPON US
The latest tidbits from the bustling live sector. (6/17a)
STEREOPHONIC, HELL'S KITCHEN WIN BIG AT TONYS
Rock and R&B take over Broadway. (6/17a)
THE GRAMMY SHORT LIST
Who's already a lock?
COUNTRY'S NEWEST DISRUPTOR
Three chords and some truth you may not be ready for.
AI IS ALREADY EATING YOUR LUNCH
The kids can tell the difference... for now.
INDIE DISTRIBUTION'S RISE TO GLORY
The discovery engine is revving higher.
Music City
MICKEY GUYTON'S GRAMMY BREAKOUT
3/16/21

It's probably fair to say that a great many viewers of the 3/14 Grammy telecast had never heard of Mickey Guyton before. It's also reasonable to surmise that they hadn't heard a country song quite like the one performed by the Capitol Nashville breakout, who was nominated for Best Country Solo Performance.

Yes, "Black Like Me" has a soaring chorus, sturdily crafted lyrics, aching pedal-steel accents and intimate details of small-town America. But its message, as expressed in that chorus—"If you think we live in the land of the free/ You should try to be black like me"—is, we think you'll agree, unique for the genre. And Guyton's rendition on the Grammy stage? Well, if you didn't catch it the first time, see for yourself. "Black Like Me" has moved into the Top 20 at iTunes as of this writing. Guyton, a Warner Chappell songwriter, will co-host the ACM Awards with Keith Urban on 4/18. She's also a 2021 ACM nominee for New Female Vocalist.