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UMG'S VALUATION NEARS $55B
Day one begins. (9/23a)
SAVE THE DATE: GRAMMY NOMS REVEALED 11/23
Whoa, that's early. (9/21a)
A HARD DAY’S
HITS LIST
Stars across the board (9/21a)
NEAR TRUTHS:
THE LUCIAN DECADE
A history lesson from I.B. Bad (9/23a)
SIR LUCIAN TURNS IT UP
As UMG goes solo, Grainge discusses leading the band. (9/20a)
HITS' 35TH ANNIVERSARY
A chronicle of the inexplicable.
GRAMMY: ALBUM OF THE YEAR
We make yet more predictions, which you are free to ignore.
2022 TOURS
May we all be vaxxed by then.
ROCK'S NEW CHAPTER
Power pop, global glam and the return of the loud.
Music City
MANAGERS WEIGH IN: FLETCHER FOSTER (F2 ENTERTAINMENT)
7/28/20

What’s the biggest challenge ahead?
There are several, from the lack of artists making personal appearances and touring to finding ways of developing new artists beyond just their music or hit song. Now more than ever, the biggest challenge is to be able to move quick and be nimble. The power of technology and how fast things can move has never been more relevant than this year. The artists and the music should reflect that.

Any bright spots?
What’s really exciting to watch is how the core of so many technologies and tech platforms have had to be tested and pushed to expand so quickly, whether it’s how we put together music specials for television and deal with audio and video quality to making music videos. Even recording vocals has been great to explore.

What’s the greatest issue facing country music?
It may be the livelihood of Country radio. Radio has been such a foundation for exposing country music for so long, and with the loss of listeners from there not being a drive time since people are working from home, as well as the loss of advertising dollars with local businesses being closed because of the pandemic, they’re going to have challenges going forward, it appears. And I’d hate to see any outlets that expose music and artists go away, whether it’s print, television or radio.

Who’s your pick for Entertainer of the Year and why?
Great question. Considering touring, a huge chunk of what defines this award has not really happened since last year’s CMA Awards. It will be interesting to see if the voters put more weight on sales and streaming success. If that’s the case, it could be Luke Combs.

What do you hope for the industry?
I hope that the industry really unites during this time—and as Maya Angelou said, we realize that “we are more alike than unalike.” The industry is naturally going to be smaller from a business-staffing position, and I hope we don’t lose so many of the good people who have a moral compass and really try to do the right and good things for artists and musicians.