Quantcast
Advertisement
 Email

 First Name

 Last Name

 Company

 Country
CAPTCHA code
Captcha: (type the characters above)

REVENUE CHART:
FAST FORWARD
The Sony side of the street (8/5a)
NEW & DEVELOPING ARTISTS: Q3 EDITION
The lifeblood of the biz is pumping. (8/5a)
OLIVIA INKS WITH SONY PUB
Big score (8/5a)
THE HAPPIEST TOP 20
Billie's back...on her own terms. (8/5a)
NEAR TRUTHS:
CAVEAT EMPTOR
Vaxx mandate gains steam. (8/5a)
NEW & DEVELOPING ARTISTS
From tender shoots to mighty oaks.
MARKETSHARE MANIA
Let's do the numbers.
DELTA VARIANT
It is not the name of a Henry Miller novel.
IS IT TIME FOR ANOTHER ROCK STORY?
Could be. Dunno.
Music City
WHEN TAYLOR SPOKE UP
8/14/17

By Holly Gleason

When Taylor Swift took the witness stand in Denver, it seemed many people had forgotten—she was being sued. This public rehashing of an ugly breach-of-personal-space (a clinical term for gross sexual assault) was not instigated by Swift lashing out at a guy who lost all sense of courtesy, boundaries or couth. It was a result of a $3,000,0000 suit brought against her because his employer decided they didn’t cotton to that sort of conduct.

Swift—who countersued for sexual assault—had the “privilege” of retreading the experience of a man, an industry professional who should know better, sliding his hand under her garment, and grabbing her “ass.” When the picture-perfect star tersely hurled the term, she more than echoed the attitude of the kind of man who might consider such an action funny, a good story—or who just decided to act on his worst impulses. She’s not coming at him, people. On the day of the incident, she went back to the dressing room and told her mother—more than many victims of sexual assault or harassment get to do—and they had the gentleman escorted from the building. If they let his employer know, providing physical back-up, that’s only good stewardship: who wants someone repping their call letters who crosses those kinds of lines?

...Read the rest here.