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BATTLE OF THE
HITS LIST STARS
Celebrity faceoff (6/24a)
CHART FINAL: DRAKE'S DANCE VICTORY
Drizzy's fox trot (6/24a)
SOULFUL NOIR
Today's quiet storm (6/24a)
COOPER PLANS TO DEPART WMG IN '23
See ya later, alligator. (6/23a)
NEAR TRUTHS: FROM THE MOUNTAINTOPS
I.B. Bad surveys the landscape. (6/22a)
SUPERSTAR RELEASES
Who's next?
MUSIC BIZ SPECIAL
It's Comic-Con for numbers geeks.
THE BIG CHEESE
Theories of evolution from 30,000 feet.
THE NEXT GIANT DEAL
A&R in overdrive.
Music City
LIVE FROM NASHVILLE:
NICK MEINEMA
7/6/17

Nick Meinema, Co-Head, UTA Nashville

Given Nashville’s changing landscape, what’s changing in your world? How are you meeting the challenge? What needs to be fixed?
As artists continue to expand their interests into other avenues, it’s essential for us to provide them with the tools they need to execute their vision. We believe in providing full-service representation and have a clear and uninterrupted dialog with our colleagues across all departments, allowing us to bring a myriad of opportunities to our clients. We recently made two significant hires in our Nashville office that really highlight this mandate. Nick Barnes was hired to run our digital music strategy and Greg Janese to head our corporate and private events division; both work out of our Nashville office but touch the worldwide roster.

What are your thoughts on festivals? Are they sustainable? What’s their impact on your overall touring business?
It’s incumbent upon us to find the right opportunities for artists. Festivals are an all-or-nothing type of thing, and it’s our responsibility to ensure that artists are playing the right festival, in the right slot, etc. When everything aligns, this can be a game-changing experience for the artist, and that changes their trajectory with their fans, media and radio. Festivals are currently seeing a resurgence in “legacy” artists from the last few decades, bringing in crowds that are younger that are still really connecting to the music. You can see it at almost every festival, hitmakers are coming to the side stage to watch the artists they grew up listening to and it’s been amazing to see how it’s come full circle. Additionally, country music has become way more wide-ranging—you have High Valley playing with Tim and Faith and Toby Keith, Chris Stapleton and Alan Jackson headlining festival nights with FGL, and Thomas Rhett among others.

How are you facing the challenge of exporting your country acts?
It’s usually case by case. However, when an artist wants to focus on markets outside of the U.S., the opportunities can be limitless. We had great success with the band High Valley as they were really eager to play as many different markets as possible. We started with the C2C Festival in 2016. They returned for an 11-date run, playing venues ranging from 250-500 cap, selling out their London show—which was one of their best performances to date. The success of this run was based on the festival play, social media, press and help from their label. You have to take the music to the fans, no matter where they are, and if it’s done right, they will be there to support the artist.