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OUR POST-GRAMMY CHEW TAKES LESS THAN FOUR HOURS TO READ
We'll let you get back to your day ASAP. (2/7a)
HITS LIST WINNERS
Here's who's lighting up the scoreboard before and after the Grammys. (2/3a)
GRAMMY-WEEK ALBUM: PICS TO CLICK
Including shots of several luminaries entrapped by a HITS nerd. (2/8a)
GRAMMY RATINGS SOAR
The emphasis on star power seems to have worked. (2/7a)
A TASTE OF RAINMAKERS:
JIM ROPPO
Building blocks of a singular career (2/8a)
HIP-HOP AT 50
The astonishing first half-century of a world-rocking genre.
THE NEXT BIG PLAYER
in the catalog game is...
INDIE BREAKOUTS
More independent music rises at the DSPs.
THE GOP CONGRESS
At last, America can focus 24/7 on Hunter Biden's laptop.
Music City
MUSIC CITY PITCHMEN: ED GREEN
7/19/16

Head of Promotion, Red Light Management and
ATO Records


In his 25-year career in promotion, Green worked at Geffen, Island, Columbia and Capitol, the last-named label as SVP. Most of his promotion experience was in the Pop format before joining Red Light and ATO in 2012. Green moved from the Red Light L.A. office to the Nashville office two years ago.

Between consolidation and syndicated programs, how different is it now to successfully build and close records?
With the major radio chains shrinking their current playlists while at the same time implementing chain-wide major-artist premieres and new-artist launch programs, the amount of slots for other artists’ songs to be rotated and exposed in many day parts is very limited. Because of the time it takes a programmer to get the proper data to justify moving a record up a category and then have that data approved by their regional VPs, we’ve been seeing a large number of developing acts sitting below #30 on the charts for months before breaking through. It’s a double-edged sword, because when a new artist gets the opportunity to be featured on a launch program, it can be a career-establishing moment. For a new artist who does not get that launch program, it means fighting, clawing and micro-managing every spin and every opportunity.


Why do you feel country artists’ relationships with radio are so much stronger than at any other format?
Having worked for many years on the Pop side, I was pleasantly surprised to get a “Yes” every time I asked one of our country artists to do an early-morning radio interview, do a big fan meet-and-greet for a station, perform at charity events or make calls to thank programmers for support. This was new territory for me. It’s commonplace for artists and programmers to exchange phone numbers, call each other on birthdays or anniversaries and have relationships outside of the business. This is a community.