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OUR POST-GRAMMY CHEW TAKES LESS THAN FOUR HOURS TO READ
We'll let you get back to your day ASAP. (2/7a)
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Building blocks of a singular career (2/8a)
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The astonishing first half-century of a world-rocking genre.
THE NEXT BIG PLAYER
in the catalog game is...
INDIE BREAKOUTS
More independent music rises at the DSPs.
THE GOP CONGRESS
At last, America can focus 24/7 on Hunter Biden's laptop.
Music City
MUSIC CITY PITCHMEN: STEVE HODGES
7/19/16

EVP Promotion & Artist Development,
Sony Music Nashville


After 12 years in radio, Hodges made the jump to the record side and went to work for Capitol Nashville as a regional. After 20 years at Capitol, eventually rising to SVP Promotion—including the launching of EMI Nashville—he switched horses to Sony in July 2015.

How is launching a project different today than it was five or even three years ago?
Dynamics are changing daily. Music consumption is at an all-time high, but fans are discovering the music in a variety of ways. The onus is on us, as an entertainment industry, to help deliver that critical mass exposure for the artists and their music. Country radio is still a key driver in our world, but we’re also very aware of all the different platforms that exist, and we work hard to maximize those opportunities, daily. Some of those weren’t even around a few years ago. That’s how fast our world is evolving.

Why do you feel country artists’ relationships with radio are so much stronger than at any other format?
There’s a definite bond between artists and programmers/air talent in country music. Most of them have real-life stories and share common backgrounds, family and life experiences. I also think there’s a level of respect for each other’s crafts, with each knowing how critical one is to the other. Artist managers are keenly aware of this and do a great job of fostering this environment as well. Artists in our format dedicate a great amount of time on the road just to meet programmers/staff at country radio. It’s an admirable, top-notch work ethic.