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HITS LIST:
HOME RUN DERBY
Going yard (7/11a)
SONG REVENUE:
SCHLEMIEL, SHABOOZEY
Th epitome of new country (7/11a)
GRAMMY PRE-CHEW:
THREE QUESTIONS ABOUT THE BIG 4
On your Marks, get set, go. (7/8a)
TOWARD A FRUITFUL GRAMMY SEASON
Our editurr in chief has something on his mined. (7/10a)
SABRINA TO REACH NEW HEIGHTS WITH TOUR MERCH?
Her table's stacked. (7/10a)
THE GRAMMY SHORT LIST
Who's already a lock?
COUNTRY'S NEWEST DISRUPTOR
Three chords and some truth you may not be ready for.
AI IS ALREADY EATING YOUR LUNCH
The kids can tell the difference... for now.
INDIE DISTRIBUTION'S RISE TO GLORY
The discovery engine is revving higher.
Critics' Choice
80 IS THE NEW 40 (LICKS)
10/25/23

By Bud Scoppa

No, Ronnie Wood and producer Andrew Watt haven’t wandered into a White Stripes photo shoot—they’re at Bravado’s RS No. 9 pop-up store in NYC, which opened on 10/19, just hours before the release of The Rolling StonesHackney Diamonds (Geffen).

The LP, by the way, is a gratifyingly fun listen, and the reviewers largely agree: It got a 79 score on Metacritic based on 17 reviews. These critiques range from crazily effusive (The Independent) to ridiculously off the mark (Pitchfork, of course), the latter of which is 4.5 times as laughable as the former.

"Back in the day, 'pop-up store' meant something a bit different," reminisced Wood to Watt. The rest of his comments were redacted, as this is a family publication.

For some even-handed perspective, read Uproxx critic Steven Hyden’s ranking of Diamonds in the context of The Stones’ “late period” albums, which is generally defined as the eight they’ve released since 1981’s Tattoo You. “What it means,” Hyden opines, “is that you’re looking for three things: Credibly insouciant vocals by Mick, some reasonably raucous guitar weaving from Keith and Ronnie, and the reliable backbeat of Charlie Watts (or, in lieu of Charlie, his capable replacement, Steve Jordan). Hackney Diamonds delivers on all three counts. It is a good late-period Stones record.”

We concur. Indeed, “Bite My Head Off” (featuring Paul McCartney on vicious fuzz bass), “Live by the Sword” (anchored by Charlie and Bill Wyman), “Mess It Up” (Charlie’s other appearance), rippling dual-guitar rocker “Get Close” and the ’70s-evoking big ballad “Depending on You” are all candidates for our year-end playlist, standing tall alongside Jason Isbell, The National, Jamila Woods, boygenius and Wilco. Did not see that coming.