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5/26/20

Drummer Jimmy Cobb, the last surviving member of Miles DavisKind of Blue sextet, died Sunday at his New York City home from lung cancer. He was 91.

Cobb started working in Davis’ band beginning in 1959 with Kind of Blue, the best-selling jazz album of all time, after recording with that band’s two saxophonists, Cannonball Adderley and John Coltrane. He would continue his association with Davis on Porgy and Bess, Sketches of Spain, Someday My Prince Will Come and would tour with the trumpeter as well, appearing on several live albums. Cobb also recorded regularly with Kind of Blue pianist Wynton Kelly and bassist Paul Chambers.

Besides Coltrane and Adderley, Cobb also worked with Wayne Shorter, Wes Montgomery, Art Pepper, Sarah Vaughan and Dinah Washington on recordings and in concert.

In his 70s, Cobb would release albums that paid tribute to Davis as well as Kelly and Chambers. His last album, This I Dig of You (Smoke Sessions Records), recorded when he was 90, was released in August.