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HITS LIST:
’TIS THE SEASON
Like all the ones we used to know. (12/5a)
GRAMMY CHEW: (SORT OF) HANDICAPPING THE BIG 4
Your guess is as good as ours. (12/4a)
SONG REVENUE:
SEASONAL POTPOURRI
Decking the halls with long green (12/1a)
RAINMAKERS: JORGE MEJIA
A taste of the latest annual edition (12/4a)
DOLLIMORE IS BUZZING (AND NOT JUST FROM THE COFFEE)
Something brewing... (12/4a)
AI: RISKS AND REWARDS
How the biz might use this powerful new tech—and the threats it could pose.
HOW LONG WILL TRUMP'S PRISON SENTENCE BE?
Oh, sorry... we were just daydreaming.
RAINMAKERS 2023
The stories behind the biggest industry careers.
IS IT CHRISTMAS YET?
Blighty Beat
HALF OF MUSICIANS EARN UNDER £14K
9/11/23

The average annual income of U.K. musicians from music work is £20.7k ($26k), although nearly half earn less than £14k, according to research from the Musicians’ Union and Help Musicians.

Nearly a quarter (23%) of 6k U.K. musicians surveyed by the orgs said they don’t earn enough to support themselves or their families, while nearly half (44%) said a lack of sustainable income is a barrier to their music career.

Over half of respondents (53%) sustain their career by sourcing other forms of income outside of music. Nearly two thirds (62%) of these generate additional funds from alternative employment, but other sources of financial support include support from family and friends (14%) and Universal Credit or other benefits (12%).

The average income of those making 100% of their earnings from music is around £30k ($37.5k)—slightly less than the average median income in the U.K. of £33,280.

The majority of musicians (80%) reported at least one or more career-restricting barrier. Forty-six percent report cost-related challenges, with cost of equipment (30%), transport (27%) and training (18%) limiting their careers. Other barriers include no clear route for career progression (36%), not knowing anyone in the industry (25%) and unsociable working hours (22%).

The findings come from the first ever U.K. Musicians’ Census, which can be found in full here.