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NEAR TRUTHS: THE KYNCL-LOUSADA DANCE HAS BEGUN
This oughta be interesting... (9/30a)
GRAMMY CHEW:
RAP EDITION
Michael and Kyle find a feast of hip-hop to chew on. (9/30a)
CHART FINAL: VERANO INVADES FALL
Like a broken record... which it is, figuratively speaking. (9/30a)
HITS LIST: COUNTDOWN
TO ECSTASY
We enter the month that was once known as Rocktober. (9/30a)
HIS OWN ARCHITECT:
THE STEVE LACY BUZZ
It was a surprisingly easy "Habit" to break. (9/30a)
GRAMMY SEASON
New categories! New rules! New WTF!
THE BIG DEAL
It's the one you didn't see coming.
RAID AT MAR-A-LAGO
"Who took my passports?"
HITS' 36TH ANNIVERSARY SPECIAL
Allow us to apologize in advance.
Blighty Beat
STREAMING BILL STALLS
12/6/21

The streaming bill that stirred controversy in the U.K. last week hasn’t passed through Parliament, causing a collective sigh of relief amongst labels.

The bill, proposed by MP Kevin Brennan, was put up for debate on Friday to determine whether it would progress to the next stage required for prospective legislation.

Instead, the Government has encouraged finding an “industry solution” via a number of working groups to ask some “hard questions” about what labels are doing to ensure that artists are properly remunerated.

George Freeman, parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, also said the Government is open to passing legislation, if later required, or working with the Competition and Markets Authority to make sure that measures are put in place so that the “industry—and labels—respond in the right way.”

In his bill, Brennan proposed changes to U.K. copyright law that would result in equitable remuneration being applied to streams (like it is for radio, where 50% of earnings go to the copyright owner and 50% to the performer), as argued during the economics-of-streaming debate and in the subsequent report. The new right would only apply to artists who haven’t self-released (those who have could actually receive less money under the new rule than they are currently).

He also argued for contract adjustments that would offer creators the right to renegotiate old deals, copyright reversion after 20 years and transparency rights.