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REPUBLIC UPS GOLDSTEIN TO WEST COAST PREXY
Smart move (6/26a)
ACADEMY ON THE "IRONY" OF SPOTIFY OVERPAYMENT CLAIM
They cannot be serious. (6/26a)
BLACK MUSIC MONTH: THE EVOLUTION OF "WHAT'S GOING ON"
Berry didn't hear a hit. (6/26a)
BLACK MUSIC MONTH: SELECTED '70S SONGS
The Me Decade was funky as shit. (6/26a)
TOP 20: TOO CLOSE
TO CALL
We did not see this coming. (6/26a)
THE DIVA PLAN
How pop stars from the pre-streaming era are finding a new groove.
RAINMAKERS RETURN
More of the folks who are making biz history now.
THE FUTURE OF ROCK & ROLL IS...
Hang on, we just need to throw this TV out the window.
AFTER COUNTRY TRAP
Is reggaeton death metal far behind?
Critics' Choice
CADILLAC THREE: BOOTS ON THE GROUND
8/8/16


Call it country, call it Southern rock, call it your mama—whatever you call it, Bury Me in My Boots, the new set from Big Machine's The Cadillac Three, sure goes down smooth. With its big ol' guitar hooks, singalong choruses and tales of love, booze and rural adventure (the basic food groups, to quote Chris Stapleton), Boots will light up your pleasure center if you like Skynyrd, Marshall Tucker and The Outlaws... or, for that matter, any of the Nashville artists currently saluting that legacy. Speaking of which, one of the album's true highlights is "The South," featuring guests and fellow Southern rock devotees Florida Georgia Line, Dierks Bentley and Mike Eli. Other standouts include the title track, the fierce "Drunk Like You," the anthemic "Graffiti," the riff-rockin' "Peace Love & Dixie" (which drops a little Black Sabbath in the bridge), the irresistibly frisky "Hot Damn" and "This Accent," a glowingly melodic expression of regional pride. Wherever singer-guitarist Jaren Johnston and his Cadillac mates are headed, we're jumpin' in.