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TAYLOR’S OLD-MEDIA TAKEOVER
Whatever it is, she's got it covered. (8/21a)
THE GRAMMY CHEW:
ALBUM CONTENDERS
These machers have one-track minds. (8/22a)
A STYLISH SUMMER?
Round two for Harry? (8/21a)
HEAVY WEATHER:
RAINMAKERS II
On your desk now! (8/21a)
LEADING UP TO LOVER
An eight-month journey (8/21a)
TAYLOR SWIFT!
Taylor Swift. Taylor Swift? Taylor Swift; Taylor. Swift. Taylor Swift!
TAYLOR SWIFT.
Taylor Swift...  
TAYLOR SWIFT?
Taylor Swift. Taylor Swift. Taylor Swift.   
TAYLOR. SWIFT.
Taylor!
Blighty Beat
INDEPENDENT WOMEN: JANE THIRD
11/20/18

As Chief Creative Officer at PIAS, Jane Third oversees everything relating to A&R, image and content, artist relations and brand. She joined the company last year after working as SVP of A&R at Because Music, where she played a key role in the launch of French act Christine & 
the Queens, and signed and developed Swedish act Little Dragon and Mercury Music Prize-nominated bands Django Django and Metronomy. At PIAS, she’s currently working with a broad range of artists on the company’s newly rebranded and relaunched labels DIFFERENT, Play It Again Sam, and PIAS Recordings. Those include Blanche, Anna of the North, Rina Sawayama and Westerman, amongst many more. Here, we asked some burning questions about breaking new music and working in today’s business. 


What are the biggest challenges you face in breaking and developing new music?
Finding a way to combat the noise and surface great artists is challenging but a fun challenge—it’s my favourite part of the job. I tend to think about marketing artists rather than records. I like to sign artists that I believe can create a movement, rather than thinking about how playlist-friendly their music is. We still rely on traditional media when it comes to really breaking an artist. I spend a lot of time wondering how we will market artists when every artist comes as a readymade package of “cool,” with a list of values to talk about publicly and an interesting story ready to go. The DIY scene is very exciting, lo-fi art and fresh ideas, but I also love working with big pop projects. Both are so much fun.

What is key to the continued success of the independent British music industry in today’s global and streaming-led world?
I don’t think the majors have an advantage in the streaming age. The objectives I have at PIAS are to optimise the catalogue we already have via various strategies including creating our own D2C platform and audiences, and optimising songwriting and content creation to give every project the best possible chance at success in the streaming space. From an A&R point of view, I’m focused on diversifying the roster, aiming to represent as much of the total diversity in the global music scene as possible.

What is the most exciting thing about British music and the industry right now—what’s on the horizon?
I’m excited by lots of things—the level of musicality I’m seeing with young artists, the endless invention and creativity that blows my mind every day. I can’t wait to see where U.K. rap, R&B and rhythmic music goes next. Something big is coming. Regarding the industry, I’m excited by the constant change brought by new technology that’s keeping us on our toes. Smart people are coming to the music industry, and that’s very welcome. I’m happy to see independent labels becoming known for their innovation, entrepreneurship and ability to break acts on a global level with a small team. Anyone can make it happen; there’s nothing standing in the way if you have the right artists and the dedication, and that’s exciting.